Domain

Learning Health System

Type

Protocol

Theme

population

Start Date

7-6-2014 10:25 AM

End Date

7-6-2014 11:45 AM

Structured Abstract

Introduction and Purpose

For the Washington Heights/Inwood Informatics Infrastructure for Comparative Effectiveness Research (WICER) project (R01HS019853), we compiled survey data from >5,800 primarily Latino members of a northern Manhattan community. Survey items included anthropometric measures (e.g., blood pressure, waist circumference, body mass index), health behaviors (e.g., physical activity, nutrition), and self-reported outcomes (e.g., depression and anxiety symptoms, sleep quality, chronic stress, overall health). We created a series of infographics that will be tailored to each participant and viewable via the community web portal GetHealthyHeights.org in order to return survey data to participants in an easily-comprehensible and actionable format. Automation of infographics tailoring necessitated the invention of an adaptable, reusable, generalizable approach we named Electronic Tailored Infographics for Community Engagement, Education, and Empowerment (EnTICE3). Integral to the success of EnTICE3 has been communication and collaboration between the team members responsible for infographic design and those responsible for technical architecture. The purpose of this abstract is to describe the key features of the style guide that facilitated interdisciplinary teamwork.

Methods

The authors worked collaboratively to identify which components of each infographic would be dynamic and the various technical architecture strategies that could be employed to automatically generate each dynamic component. Particular attention was paid to strategies flexible enough to display very low, very high, and non-missing zero values.

Innovation

The lead author created a style guide in order to convey design attributes that the technical architect subsequently transformed into formal computational processes. The following attributes were specified for each infographic: 1) study variables (e.g., age, sex, fruit servings per day); 2) comparator(s), if applicable (e.g., mean value for sex by age group); 3) units (e.g. whole numbers or tenths, ‘healthy,’ ‘borderline,’ or ‘unhealthy’); 4) criteria, if applicable (e.g., blood pressure reference ranges); 5) dynamic components (e.g., height of bar on chart, position of indicator box on tape measure); 6) versions (i.e., English and Spanish, male and female); 7) additional notes (e.g., how to treat zero values); 8) Spanish translations of all text; and 9) one or more sample graphics for reference. Also provided was a list of the fonts and color values to be used to maintain a consistent palette and style across infographics.

Discussion

The style guide facilitated communication between infographic designer and technical architect by organizing all the information necessary for rule-based programming into a consistent, structured format. The process of developing the style guide required the designer to think systematically about how each graphic would be operationalized. For the technical architect, it served as a durable reference to the desired look and functionality of the final product without dictating the strategy by which that product was to be achieved.

Conclusion

Tailored infographics are an innovative health communication medium aimed at improving population health. The development and deployment of a style guide supported the clear communication and high degree of collaboration between team members necessary to the implementation of an automated tailoring system. We recommend this communication framework to others engaged in similar projects.

Acknowledgements

This research is supported by R01HS019853, R01HS022961, NYS Department of Economic Development NYSTAR (C090157). Dr. Arcia is supported by T32NR007969.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.

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Jun 7th, 10:25 AM Jun 7th, 11:45 AM

Style Guide: An Interdisciplinary Communication Tool to Support the Process of Generating Tailored Infographics From Electronic Health Data Using EnTICE3

Introduction and Purpose

For the Washington Heights/Inwood Informatics Infrastructure for Comparative Effectiveness Research (WICER) project (R01HS019853), we compiled survey data from >5,800 primarily Latino members of a northern Manhattan community. Survey items included anthropometric measures (e.g., blood pressure, waist circumference, body mass index), health behaviors (e.g., physical activity, nutrition), and self-reported outcomes (e.g., depression and anxiety symptoms, sleep quality, chronic stress, overall health). We created a series of infographics that will be tailored to each participant and viewable via the community web portal GetHealthyHeights.org in order to return survey data to participants in an easily-comprehensible and actionable format. Automation of infographics tailoring necessitated the invention of an adaptable, reusable, generalizable approach we named Electronic Tailored Infographics for Community Engagement, Education, and Empowerment (EnTICE3). Integral to the success of EnTICE3 has been communication and collaboration between the team members responsible for infographic design and those responsible for technical architecture. The purpose of this abstract is to describe the key features of the style guide that facilitated interdisciplinary teamwork.

Methods

The authors worked collaboratively to identify which components of each infographic would be dynamic and the various technical architecture strategies that could be employed to automatically generate each dynamic component. Particular attention was paid to strategies flexible enough to display very low, very high, and non-missing zero values.

Innovation

The lead author created a style guide in order to convey design attributes that the technical architect subsequently transformed into formal computational processes. The following attributes were specified for each infographic: 1) study variables (e.g., age, sex, fruit servings per day); 2) comparator(s), if applicable (e.g., mean value for sex by age group); 3) units (e.g. whole numbers or tenths, ‘healthy,’ ‘borderline,’ or ‘unhealthy’); 4) criteria, if applicable (e.g., blood pressure reference ranges); 5) dynamic components (e.g., height of bar on chart, position of indicator box on tape measure); 6) versions (i.e., English and Spanish, male and female); 7) additional notes (e.g., how to treat zero values); 8) Spanish translations of all text; and 9) one or more sample graphics for reference. Also provided was a list of the fonts and color values to be used to maintain a consistent palette and style across infographics.

Discussion

The style guide facilitated communication between infographic designer and technical architect by organizing all the information necessary for rule-based programming into a consistent, structured format. The process of developing the style guide required the designer to think systematically about how each graphic would be operationalized. For the technical architect, it served as a durable reference to the desired look and functionality of the final product without dictating the strategy by which that product was to be achieved.

Conclusion

Tailored infographics are an innovative health communication medium aimed at improving population health. The development and deployment of a style guide supported the clear communication and high degree of collaboration between team members necessary to the implementation of an automated tailoring system. We recommend this communication framework to others engaged in similar projects.