Domain

Clinical Informatics

Type

Conceptual or Process Model/Framework

Theme

effectiveness; operations

Start Date

7-6-2014 1:15 PM

End Date

7-6-2014 2:45 PM

Structured Abstract

Introduction: Data infrastructure sustainability is a critical issue to optimize recent investments in health research informatics, as well as to effectively leverage systems that have been built.

Background: The United States has made recent large investments in creating data infrastructures to support the important goals of patient-centered outcomes research (PCOR) and comparative effectiveness research (CER), with more investment still planned. These initial investments, while critical to the creation of the infrastructures, are not expected to sustain them much beyond the initial development. To provide the maximum benefit, the infrastructures need to be sustained while they provide value to PCOR and CER researchers, through innovative financing models.

Findings: Based on our experience with creating flexible sustainability strategies, we defined considerations of the scope of sustaining infrastructures and potential strategies for sustainability, as well as how various stakeholders can participate in maintaining an infrastructure. We also identifid specific considerations for creating a flexible and adaptive strategy for maintaining an infrastructure, so that the long-term intended benefits can be realized.

Lessons learned: We made four important summary observations about sustainability that are discussed. 1) There are significant ongoing costs to support a research and analytic infrastructure; 2) Costs can be covered if value can be created; 3) Having multiple stakeholders increases the opportunity and complexity of sustaining an infrastructure, and 4) Stakeholders may support an infrastructure to keep flexibility in an emerging area.

Conclusions: Sustainability, while rarely discussed, is critical to creating long-term value of research data infrastructures. Our findings and lessons learned can be important in clarifying and directing sustainability efforts.

Acknowledgements

AHRQ R01 HS019853, Washington Heights/Inwood Informatics Infrastructure for Community-Centered Comparative Effectiveness Research (WICER)

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.

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Jun 7th, 1:15 PM Jun 7th, 2:45 PM

Sustainability Considerations for Health Research and Analytic Data Infrastructures

Introduction: Data infrastructure sustainability is a critical issue to optimize recent investments in health research informatics, as well as to effectively leverage systems that have been built.

Background: The United States has made recent large investments in creating data infrastructures to support the important goals of patient-centered outcomes research (PCOR) and comparative effectiveness research (CER), with more investment still planned. These initial investments, while critical to the creation of the infrastructures, are not expected to sustain them much beyond the initial development. To provide the maximum benefit, the infrastructures need to be sustained while they provide value to PCOR and CER researchers, through innovative financing models.

Findings: Based on our experience with creating flexible sustainability strategies, we defined considerations of the scope of sustaining infrastructures and potential strategies for sustainability, as well as how various stakeholders can participate in maintaining an infrastructure. We also identifid specific considerations for creating a flexible and adaptive strategy for maintaining an infrastructure, so that the long-term intended benefits can be realized.

Lessons learned: We made four important summary observations about sustainability that are discussed. 1) There are significant ongoing costs to support a research and analytic infrastructure; 2) Costs can be covered if value can be created; 3) Having multiple stakeholders increases the opportunity and complexity of sustaining an infrastructure, and 4) Stakeholders may support an infrastructure to keep flexibility in an emerging area.

Conclusions: Sustainability, while rarely discussed, is critical to creating long-term value of research data infrastructures. Our findings and lessons learned can be important in clarifying and directing sustainability efforts.